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Anyone using Kranzle Powerwashers?

JC220

Active member
For a long time now I have wanted to buy a new cold pressure washer for washing my own cars. Something that will allow applying snow foam and lots of power for rinsing off. I already have a large Lavor Diesel steam cleaner for really heavy duty washing like engine blocks but it's way too big to wheel out and wash a car with.

I have had Karcher before and what a waste of money!! They appear disposable and designed to just outlive the warranty before giving up.... not wanting to waste more money I wanted to try and find a quality professional grade unit.

Has anyone heard of or used the Kranzle K1152TST? It is a high quality German made machine- I spotted a video from Obsessed Garage on it and from some research decided to order one from Germany today.


(The machine- not his whole kit) This is a better video just about the machine itself


Very much looking forward to trying it out when it gets here! What do you guys use in terms of setups - Snow foam setups etc?
 
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captruff

Active member
I had considered the Kranzle brand years ago, but they had so few stateside distributors I passed.

I have tried so many different brands, keep in mind the brands do not always = the manufacturers, but to name a few:

Snap On, via Costco
Karcher
GreenWorks
Sun Joe
Stark
Honda (gas powered)

The most durable in my experience has been the Greenworks from Lowes, specifically the model pictures below I have gone through about 30 units over the past 20 years

Rfc3wPT.jpg

The unit was maybe $100.00 and they offered a 2 year extended warraty for another $15.00....now I typically pass on extended warranties, but since I have not had the best luck with pressure washers I decided to purchase. Well close to 2 years later the pressure washer gave up the ghost...went back to Lowes and got a replacement unit and asked if I could also purchase the same extended warranty. The said no problem and handed me close to $20.00 in change. I asked why am I getting money back?? The cost of the unit came down and even after adding the warranty back in I had money coming back to me!

That said, after watching the videos of the Kranzle with all the attachments perhaps one will be in my future, but $1,600.00 is a bit pricey, but as I remind others, "Nice things cost money!"

Jeff
 
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alabbasi

Mercedes Flopper
I have a gas powered Honda pressure washer at the shop and this Ryobi 2000psi washer at the house

https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-2-000-PSI-1-2-GPM-Electric-Pressure-Washer-RY141900/205566055

Both pressure washers have interchangeable attachments for car washing, concrete, wooden fence etc.

I bought a foam cannon attachment like this on Amazon https://www.amazon.com/MATCC-Adjustable-Connector-Blaster-Pressure/dp/B01CE78VO8/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=foam+canon&qid=1554341866&s=gateway&sr=8-3-spell

It works a treat. I think that aside from the interchangeable attachment fitting on the wand, both pressure washers are waaaay over kill for washing a car. If you have fence , siding or decking. They will come in handy.
 

Maui

Zivil Ingenieur
I have a Subaru pressure washer that I picked up from Costco. I have used it for all kinds of stuff from cleaning the deck to car parts. I think I paid about $300 for it. I paid for with my Costco card rebate. It's gas powered and has an electric start. I love it.
 

LWB250

"But - but - he'll see the big board!!!"
I think that aside from the interchangeable attachment fitting on the wand, both pressure washers are waaaay over kill for washing a car. If you have fence , siding or decking. They will come in handy.
Agreed. I can’t imagine the damage I could do to my cars with a pressure washer. Maybe, maybe I would consider it for the undercarriage, but not any painted surface.

There’s something to be said for hand washing a car, and it also doesn’t involve having to roll a bunch of equipment out to do it, either.

For what it’s worth, I like to hand wash a car before I buy it. This lets me see far more details than just walking around and looking. Amazing the stuff you find this way, too.

Dan
 

atg

Active member
Pressure washers dont really clean the car, no matter how expensive they are. The boundary layer effect limits how effective water can be at the paint surface so you end up using a brush or cloth no matter how pricey the washer is.

I bought a Simpson mega shot 2750 some years ago and it has been super. Honda motor. You can get them as powerful as you like but for 1600 suffice it to say you could have something in a Simpson that will remove wood from itself.

Mine was about 350 and works great on cars. Always starts. Could use a hose reel but that's about all it needs.

https://www.gxparts.com/product/339/060551?gclid=Cj0KCQjw1pblBRDSARIsACfUG10md102nluM-FO8DbudfxR9HBijHgq3_fzA7nBlUjc9IPkuozG0U7QaArT3EALw_wcB

I know a guy who makes the ones they use on airplanes. That would probably be worth the spend. It uses compressed air and water both at the same time r separately with a three stage trigger. More of a nozzle than a pressure washer and you need a big compressor to keep up with it. Probably light years ahead of any pressure washer type thing and still easy on the paint. I will get one from him and report back; I have a 5hp beall that should pump enough air for it.

87 300TD om606 compound turbo
94 e420
85 300tdt
 

gerryvz

Site Honcho
Staff member
The cheap and weak Karcher type power washers are pretty good for cleaning wheel well areas and modest undercarriage cleaning.

I would NEVER clean the exterior paint with a power washer of any type. Hose and two buckets only for me.
 

JC220

Active member
Gents – thankyou for the great comments so far! I forgot to mention that I also have a high powered Honda gas pressure washer – with an Interpump WS201 200bar Industrial pump. And that for many years 2x of my brothers as teenagers ran a weekend carwash service near our home using this Honda machine. That is a powerful washer which I myself now own but reserve for washing my driveway exclusively. Why? It requires a water butt to draw it’s supply from – a garden hose is not sufficient. Too big a faf to use it for washing my car once off. Same goes for my Diesel Lavor NPX “hotbox” which I only reserve for very tough underbody + engine block degreasing. It is amazing at that task! I could not restore car’s without the Lavor NPX

Now – my brothers used the Honda gasser for years and washed 100’s if not 1000’s of cars with it. How many were damaged by washing them with this Honda high power pressure washer? None. Zero. Zilch. With respect – if an idiot is behind the lance of course you can do damage using most any equipment so let’s not point out the obvious here. (I try not to be an idiot most of the time – so I think I’ll manage)

I have also exclusively hand washed my cars for many years. But despite me not using a chamois regularly (Too small good weather windows in Ireland to bother at times!) my car’s all suffer swirl marks. I believe now that using just a garden hosepipe and sponge method is contributing to these swirl marks, if not the no1 cause! So this is why I seek to change my method up and Snow Foam and pre rinse off dirt / grit as much as possible prior to touching the car paint with a sponge or mit. This is more of a detailer type wash and here are a couple of links to describe “the proper” way to wash your car!

https://detailingemporium.com/pre-wash-snow-foam-guide/


This is all aimed to prevent inflicting swirl marks in your paint by rubbing around surface grit or dirt which is the case with a simple garden hose + sponge wash IMO. Each to their own but this is something I want to improve upon personally. What I am wanting here is a quality and portable electric washer – with built in hose reel etc and the ability to provide decent power + applying snow foam. I will store it in my front garage so it will be easy to roll out, plug in and get going. Note also that cheap electric washers tend to come with quite tough, hard plastic hoses which are too short to wash a car, let alone a W220 LWB etc. This Kranzle has a 15m / 50 Ft hose which is professional grade, very flexible and thinner than your average Karcher etc.

For the machine itself – I paid £600GBP (784 USD) including shipping from Germany. Which was the upper end of my budget but I will most always try to buy the best I can..... buy cheap, buy twice as they say. Which is definitely the case with cheaper washers – and I have learned this with my Karcher POS already. I think this Kranzle will be just what I was looking for – fingers crossed!
 

gerryvz

Site Honcho
Staff member
The "two-bucket" wash method can help reduce swirl marks by getting rid of grime when rinsing your sponge and/or wash gear.
 

JC220

Active member
The "two-bucket" wash method can help reduce swirl marks by getting rid of grime when rinsing your sponge and/or wash gear.
Yes that's true too Gerry- I will be equipping myself with 2x or 3 buckets + grit guards etc too :oldster:

For what it’s worth, I like to hand wash a car before I buy it. This lets me see far more details than just walking around and looking. Amazing the stuff you find this way, too.

Dan
Sorry Dan but I cant stop wondering how this works! Do you go view a car with bucket and sponge in hand and ask if you can wash it for them? Or test drive it and wash it when out with it?

I ask just because its intriguing! Heck when I view a car I feel bad checking the VINs and looking under the oil filler cap :blink:
 

LWB250

"But - but - he'll see the big board!!!"
Sorry Dan but I cant stop wondering how this works! Do you go view a car with bucket and sponge in hand and ask if you can wash it for them? Or test drive it and wash it when out with it?

I ask just because its intriguing! Heck when I view a car I feel bad checking the VINs and looking under the oil filler cap :blink:
If it’s a car I’m serious about purchasing, yes, I ask nicely if I can wash the car, and I make sure I have my bucket and car wash stuff in my car. And yes, I have gotten some raised eyebrows when I ask, but I explain why and nearly every seller has said, “Gee, that’s a pretty good idea.”

I’ve yet to have someone refuse, but I did have a seller once tell me they would wash it and let me watch. I did. Not as useful, but watching gave me some insight into how they cared for the car. Sort of threw me off, but since I had asked I figured I might as well go through with it.

Dan
 

msq

Active member
Anytime you use anything (sponge, 100% cotton towels, chamois etc.) to wash or dry a car you are going to create thousands of little scratches/mini-swirl marks. I have tried everything (I remember one site saying to dry the car, make sure the towel was 100% cotton and not only 100% cotton, but it had to be 100% American cotton they said because you could not be sure it was all cotton - and I even tried that for drying the car). As soon as you put any material (cotton, natural sponge etc.) against your paint and apply any pressure you are going to create micro-fine scratches.

I do think that pressure washing (at right pressure with the right soap etc.) can work and is better than hand wash, and you can easily do it without damaging the paint. How do I know? I did a little experiment: - all of my other cars I have used some kind of material to wash the car (highest quality I could find, based on a lot of homework etc.) and ALL of them end up with thousands of little micro-scratches. One of my cars I would wash with expensive/high quality clothes/soaps etc and then clay, and use super high end waxes etc. and it still had micro-scratches - sure you can hide it with good "paint correction", but as soon as you wash it, it will happen again.

Then on my BMW, since new, I have never let anything touch the surface except high pressure wash (there is a local wash that has great high pressure/hands free wash plus high pressure undercarriage & wheel wash. Typically most of these are useless, but this is a good one)...it's been 3 1/2 years of nearly weekly washes and you can't find any swirl marks, there are none of those thousands of little micro-scratches, zero paint damage and funny enough I get more unsolicited compliments on the car than my other cars and people think its "new". Over time, each time I get in the car and see a section of the hood I think "I never had any cars paint look that good after 3 1/2 years".
 
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JC220

Active member
Anytime you use anything (sponge, 100% cotton towels, chamois etc.) to wash or dry a car you are going to create thousands of little scratches/mini-swirl marks. I have tried everything (I remember one site saying to dry the car, make sure the towel was 100% cotton and not only 100% cotton, but it had to be 100% American cotton they said because you could not be sure it was all cotton - and I even tried that for drying the car). As soon as you put any material (cotton, natural sponge etc.) against your paint and apply any pressure you are going to create micro-fine scratches.

I do think that pressure washing (at right pressure with the right soap etc.) can work and is better than hand wash, and you can easily do it without damaging the paint. How do I know? I did a little experiment: - all of my other cars I have used some kind of material to wash the car (highest quality I could find, based on a lot of homework etc.) and ALL of them end up with thousands of little micro-scratches. One of my cars I would wash with expensive/high quality clothes/soaps etc and then clay, and use super high end waxes etc. and it still had micro-scratches - sure you can hide it with good "paint correction", but as soon as you wash it, it will happen again.

Then on my BMW, since new, I have never let anything touch the surface except high pressure wash (there is a local wash that has great high pressure/hands free wash plus high pressure undercarriage & wheel wash. Typically most of these are useless, but this is a good one)...it's been 3 1/2 years of nearly weekly washes and you can't find any swirl marks, there are none of those thousands of little micro-scratches, zero paint damage and funny enough I get more unsolicited compliments on the car than my other cars and people think its "new". Over time, each time I get in the car and see a section of the hood I think "I never had any cars paint look that good after 3 1/2 years".
Thanks for the comments- interesting that non contact washes made a perceivable difference in paint swirl marks. I may just try that on my daily driver for a bit and see if non contact pressure washing (with appropriate detergents) keeps it clean enough.

It had taken what feels like a loooonnnnngggg time but the Kranzle is supposed to arrive from Germany today
 

Melville

Active member
Speaking with professional detailers, they say the most important stage in washing a car is the high pressure rinse before you put mitt to paint. As noted above, if you can see dirt etc. on the car when you put the wash mitt on the paint, you are rubbing grit along the surface. The soap helps lubricate it, but it's still an abrasive. I spend a lot of time hosing my cars off before I wash. I use a regular garden nozzle, not a pressure washer, but I put it at the highest setting and focus on removing as much visible dirt etc. as possible. And for the spots that remain, I tackle them separately as I get to each panel to make sure I'm not dragging grit along the paint. I've been meaning to get a pressure washer for a while to speed this process up. Of course, you can't be foolish with it, but it will speed up the process and not caused damage if used properly.

Even with the two bucket method, if you are just using regular hose pressure to get your car wet before using a wash mitt, you're probably scratching the paint.
 

gerryvz

Site Honcho
Staff member
The bottom line is that there is basically nothing you can do to NOT get swirl marks -- you will get them sooner or later. Sure, some techniques accelerate or exacerbate getting them. But just driving your car in the real world, guarantees that airborne abrasives/sand/dirt/particles are going to hit, land on and scratch your paint. Not to mention rocks and stones. It happens. You can minimize this, but you can NEVER eliminate the acquisition of blemishes (however fine) and swirl marks unless you NEVER drive your car.

And even then, the act of putting on and taking off a car cover is going to introdude micro-abrasions on the paint (very much like the "micro-aggressions" we hear about on college campuses and in society at large these days). I do understand that both micro-abrasions and micro-aggressions do make some here want to run and find a safe space to get away from the stress of having to deal with it.

Waxing and occasional polishing helps minimize micro-abrasions' visibility and effect, but they eventually return.

We can't get too anal about this stuff -- maintaining factory showroom perfection in automotive paint finishes is impossible to achieve in the real world, with a car that is actually driven.

My advice -- drive, enjoy, wash when dirty, polish when needed, keep waxed, drive, enjoy.....rinse, repeat......
 

Hakie

Active member
I use a (small) Kranzle powerwasher to pre-wash and rinse after soaping the car by hand. Works perfect for me. I wash my cars in less then 10 minutes. After rinsing I only wipe them roughly dry. No spots, stains or anything.
The water here normally contains a high amount of (calque?). I mounted a water softener in the system to reduce the calque level to 0. That is a big improvement for taps, quookers, washing machine, dishwasher, coffee maker, etcetera. Everything stays as good as new.
7182F88D-E284-43C9-B5FF-235EA68E7A74.jpegB8677701-3DAC-444E-BBFB-0D7922BCC51C.jpegE526E6C6-7570-4A59-B6E7-15DF8B8F82A2.jpeg566CAF1E-A43B-4B5F-B37D-071BDB3BD2D9.jpeg
 

JC220

Active member
The Kranzle turned up today, finally! (The courier was a joke but I'll not get into that)

No shipping damage thankfully and the first impression is the weight of it - at least twice that of a similar Karcher etc. I got it set up very easily just to make sure all was well. My foam cannon etc is here too so tomorrow I will give it a whirl on my daily driver w211 first.

The quality of this thing is turned up to 11. The sort of quality German stuff I really only associate with older benzes! You get what you pay for - and this is worth every penny
 
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