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Multi-spline Extractor (aka "Easy-Out")

DerFuror

500E Terminus Illuminatus
Here’s a tool set worth every penny; especially when it comes to removing buggered up fasteners. The multi-spline extractor is a different version of what is commonly called an “Easy-out”. This tool excels in removing buggered-up socket head (Allen) setcrews; especially when the setscrew is located in a confined location. The best part about using this particular item is that no precision left-hand drilling & further precaution is required as the more commonly known version of “Easy-out” requires.

I had to remove a 5mm hex socket setscrew in order to proceed on an important 500E project (subject of a future write-up). Naturally, the setscrew is located in a supreme PITA location. I believe this setscrew may have been “set” by someone else in the past, because the hex socket corners appeared ever-so-slightly rounded. The possibly over-torqued setscrew defiantly resisted the removal attempts of standard hex keys. Any further attempts would only succeed in further rounding out the hex socket flats, leaving me furiously SOL (sh*t outta luck).

I selected an extractor which bedded into the setscrew hex socket. This extractor was fit into a 13mm socket on a ratchet. Slowly turning the ratchet, the extractor splines firmly dug into the hex socket, broke the torque tension and reversed the setscrew out easily. Joy to the World! :triumphant:

The multi-spline extractor indeed provided an “easy” solution to a potentially huge problem & all the coinciding aggravation attached to it & passed on to others.
 

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redred

Member
Great suggestion!! Those "easy outs" are a huge PITA and rarely work for me. In the past, around 90% of the time I would have to use a dremel tool and cut a slot into the head of the screw and then use a nice fat slot screwdriver.

The Irwin set looks like a great and easy option.
 

DerFuror

500E Terminus Illuminatus
In the past, around 90% of the time I would have to use a dremel tool and cut a slot into the head of the screw and then use a nice fat slot screwdriver.
:sawzall:Slotting was an impossibility. Also, there was no room to fit an "over-the-head"-style of extractor in this situation. :(
 

vexed

Member
I have stripped at least two rotor set screws and used my screws out to destroy and remove them. The worst situation I ever had was when someone (not me hint spouse) stripped a hex screw that held one of my cab's hydraulic cylinders in place. It was deep inside the cavity by the rear wheel and very hard to access. Ultimately since it was partially out I used needle nosed vice grips, another handy tool for stubborn bolts to remove it. It was a $45 part through Rusty to replace.:whistling2:
 
Nice advise (as usual) Dave!
I used "1 click" and ordered via the link you provided for Amazon with "Prime".....free shipping 2 day delivery!!

Brian
 

DerFuror

500E Terminus Illuminatus
The Return of the Hammerhand

...the bolt head snapped off when I tightened it. Sooo.. everything had to come out again and I drilled and extracted to broken bolt.

I had a run in with a similar situation yesterday. My BMW pal (who almost unjustifiably owns a 740il) requested my advice on what could be done regarding a rear brake caliper mounting bolt which had its head snapped off. What was left of the bolt was still firmly threaded within the caliper body.

BMW_caliper 007.jpg

His budding weight-lifting shade-tree mechanic son, who I affectionately refer to as Roid Hammerhand, had been in the early stages of replacing the rear brake pads for his father. The passenger side caliper bolts proved extremely difficult for him to remove. Using an undersized ratchet, a tremendous effort (which included striking a cheater bar with a maul) managed to loosen one bolt. A further concentrated effort using the same technique resulted in the broken bolt & a huge argument in which the son stormed off into the sunset vowing to never help with the car again. :pissed:

BMW_caliper 001.jpg

The BMW was parked in his driveway with the rear end up on short jack stands. I created a work surface by placing a thick piece of plywood over the rear tire which was lying flat under the tire well. I firmly clamped the caliper to the plywood with C-clamps. I center punched the sheared bolt with a drift point. I then began center-drilling the bolt with a titanium-nitride coated step drill & cutting oil. I then inserted one of my handy-dandy Irwin bolt extractors into the hole & started to give it the business with a long ½” drive breaker bar. With a hint of smug confidence I said, “Watch this!”

Nothing. :omg:

Once the extractor bedded in, it and the bolt went nowhere. To his son’s credit, that bolt was frozen, as if cold-fused in place. Who knows whenever the caliper bolts were last removed & what torque was used to reinstall them.

Sh*t! Here we go… :doh:

I carefully continued drilling out the remainder of the M10x1.5x25 bolt & knocked out what collapsed threads I could. I then had to patiently, methodically & arduously chase new threads into the caliper body using a hand tap & lots of cutting oil. :shocking:

Overall labor was about 2.5 hours. What he lacks in mechanical prowess, my pal makes up for in cooking ability. I ate freshly made “Pigs in a Blanket” out on the back deck under a beautiful autumn sun surrounded by colorful hills & the smell of fallen leaves. Nice.

…Oh, I also discovered after all of that hand tapping that I can now crush hickory nutshells right-handed using only three fingers!

There was more mention of food & drink before I left, so I’m going back tomorrow to show him how to install the brake pads.
 

DerFuror

500E Terminus Illuminatus
Re: The Return of the Hammerhand

:bimmer: I inquired on today’s lunch menu, reviewed the BMW reinstallation process & then went to work on reinstallation. The Autozone aftermarket pads did not include any miscellaneous replacement hardware, pad sensors or paste. The pads did have a lot of meat on them. I had to persuade the outer pad into the caliper because of its tight clearance.

Happily, the caliper bolt properly went in the repaired hole as expected. I torqued the bolts to spec.

BMW_caliper 002.jpg

The driver side rear brake pads were replaced in about 15 minutes with no issues whatsoever. The right tools & attitude make all the difference.

BMW_caliper 003.jpg

We went test-driving. I explained the new brake pad bedding in process & all is good until the next phone call.

:nobmw:
 

samiam44

Active member
Been there done that. I have had the best luck on small shcs to use a torx bits. I had to cut a torx bit down bc it was too tall to fit. Getting it seated was nearly impossible bc no direct path. But I did it and used a extra extra long 1/4 inch wrench on it.
Torx plus electric impact is good.
Soaking w kroil, left handed drill bits. Blue wrench helps too.
You can get the blue coated or yellow cad 10.9 replacement schs from fastenal or McMaster car.
I replace hardware almost every time I service something major. Getting all the correct bolts for the water pump and fan support require waiting an extra week as it had to come from Germany.
Always hit possibly stuck bolts w a hammer, on aluminum it has nearly eliminated my issues w bolts breaking.
Michael
 

500AMM

E500E explorer
I center punched the sheared bolt with a drift point. I then began center-drilling the bolt with a titanium-nitride coated step drill & cutting oil. I then inserted one of my handy-dandy Irwin bolt extractors into the hole & started to give it the business with a long ½” drive breaker bar. With a hint of smug confidence I said, “Watch this!”
Nothing. :omg:

Once the extractor bedded in, it and the bolt went nowhere. To his son’s credit, that bolt was frozen, as if cold-fused in place. Who knows whenever the caliper bolts were last removed & what torque was used to reinstall them.
This extractor tool may not work in this situation because when it is tightened up it expand the frozen bolt, which next lock up the bolt even more inside the threaded part. If a bolt head snap off on an well working bolt, this extractor works fine due to use of less force to drive it out.

I carefully continued drilling out the remainder of the M10x1.5x25 bolt & knocked out what collapsed threads I could. I then had to patiently, methodically & arduously chase new threads into the caliper body using a hand tap & lots of cutting oil.
I don't mean to be negative, but that retapped bolt hole appears to be "double threaded" which easily can happen in such situations. But if it holds the torque and you used some bolt lock glue, a la Locktite, it may be sitting.

Been there done that. I have had the best luck on small shcs to use a torx bits. I had to cut a torx bit down bc it was too tall to fit. Getting it seated was nearly impossible bc no direct path. But I did it and used a extra extra long 1/4 inch wrench on it.
Torx plus electric impact is good.
Soaking w kroil, left handed drill bits. Blue wrench helps too.
You can get the blue coated or yellow cad 10.9 replacement schs from fastenal or McMaster car.
I replace hardware almost every time I service something major. Getting all the correct bolts for the water pump and fan support require waiting an extra week as it had to come from Germany.
Always hit possibly stuck bolts w a hammer, on aluminum it has nearly eliminated my issues w bolts breaking.
Michael
Yes, the hammer trick is almost a 100% fix on bolted aluminum parts. But make attention to what you are hammering onto - tiny aluminium parts easily crack! A good example is the M119 rotor bolts which sucks up quite a lot over time, much more than the tiny 3 mm allen key are capable to losen. So it is convenient to give the bolt a snug, but that may introduce cracks in the rotor bracket, so take care guys.

Another trick on sloppy socket head bolts is to add som grinding paste in the grip, then carefully wiggle/insert the Unbrako tool. The grit in the paste has extreme strength so they fill the gap and the grip will be tighter. Anyway, I should really like to have extractor tools in the tool box. Extractor tools for regular bolt heads are also available, last image.

-a-
 

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samiam44

Active member
Never had the paste trick work either, when my allen slips- bolt is toast. I'm using solely Stahlwille allens which tend to fit tightly.

Yes I wouldn't try the hammer trick with a rotor. Maybe I should Quote Stu Ritter " A judicious use of brut force". For those rotors if it feels like it's going to strip out immediately go for the Torx bit. If your going to replace the rotor, you can break the plastic/phenolic with pliers(not damaging anything else). One the plastic is removed, the screw will be loose and you take it out with fingers.


Michael
 

clarkz71

Clark Vader
I hate to tell you this, but all that work was for nothing

Rear pads do not require removing the caliper bracket.
BMW has a 2 piece set up, the bracket you repaired only comes off for rotor replacement.

There's 2 7mm allen/hex bolts at the rear of the caliper body.
The bracket with those 10X1.50 bolts stay on the car with the bracket.

The caliper comes off separate for pads.




 

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DerFuror

500E Terminus Illuminatus
Re: 2 pc caliper

I hate to tell you this, but all that work was for nothing

Rear pads do not require removing the caliper bracket.
BMW has a 2 piece set up, the bracket you repaired only comes off for rotor replacement.

There's 2 7mm allen/hex bolts at the rear of the caliper body.
The bracket with those 10X1.50 bolts stay on the car with the bracket.

The caliper comes off separate for pads.
Even though he had the book at his disposal, Roid didn't read the procedure to know about those 7mm bolts under the plastic caps which would allow front piece removal...therefore the conundrum, & nothing becoming something.

The something made for two afternoons of great lunches, too! :D
 

DerFuror

500E Terminus Illuminatus
I don't have the Multi-spline Extractor kit, so I am thinking about taking pliers to the plastic rotor and THEN removing the stripped bolts.

OR, wait, order the kit and do the job Derf's way.

Opinions?

Would this do the trick?

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias=tools&field-keywords=IRWIN+Tools+Hex+Head+Multi-Spline+Extractor+Set,+10-piece
Trae, if you are talking about the distributor rotor, breaking up the plastic may just be a waste of time & more trouble than its worth because the 3mm allen bolts will still be surrounded by their metal reinforcement bases...you still may very likely not be able to grip the allen "heads" with conventional tools.

Rotor 003.jpg Bosch_Rotor_used.jpg

3mm is approx 1/8". That kit should work in light of a metric kit. I bought my kit because I also found myself in a "tight" spot with few good choices. The extractor tool worked for me.

I smiled with relief as opposed to a bitter knashing of teeth. :)

PS: Some members used a Dremel to cut a slot for a screwdriver. It may be an alternative depending on which screw (& tool accessibility).
 
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Trae

Active member
Thanks for the reply Derf.
Will most likely order the kit today and give it a try.
 

gerryvz

Site Honcho
Staff member
I've got several different types of extractors and easy-outs. I've always had very mixed results with them. Sometimes they have really saved my bacon, and other times have been ineffective.

When they work, though, it makes up for the times that they don't.
 

samiam44

Active member
I just use torx bits on stripped allen screws. Nothing special. The oil cooler line was the most notable. I had to cut the bit down to almost nothing and use a 8 mm wrench on it.
FYI, a good wack with a hammer prior to trying to loosen ussually provides enough upset to prevent breakage. It also seats the allen socket.
 

gsxr

.036 Hoonigan™, E500E Boffin
Staff member
BE CAREFUL if using a hammer on these weeny rotor bolts. The aluminum rotor bracket is not particularly strong and it could be cracked or broken if you whack it too hard.

:duck:
 

Trae

Active member
OK,

Don't follow my example, but I went to the local indy shop and asked them to look at my stripped bolt.
Ran to the rest room and before I could get back, the rotor was off and lying on the top of the radiator.
I asked how they did it and they replied that they lightly tapped on the bolt with a chisel and got it to turn.
Job is now complete and car runs like a top. I guess they weren't too afraid of damaging the rotor bracket.
 
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